Reconstructive surgery

Care team

At Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) and UW Medicine, we surround you with experts who specialize in caring for people with cancer.

A handful of people make up the core of your reconstructive surgery team. You will have a reconstructive plastic surgeon from the UW Center for Reconstructive Surgery. The surgeon you see will have a great deal of experience with the procedures that match your needs. You will also have advanced practice providers, nurses and medical assistants. They have a special focus on caring for people before, during and after reconstruction. Before surgery, you will meet with the anesthesiology team to make sure your surgery will be as safe as possible. A patient care coordinator will schedule your visits. 

Others join your team based on your personal needs. We have specialists and supportive care team members based at SCCA and UW Medicine who know the issues that matter for people with cancer. All of us are here to help you prepare and recover. 

“We are like a big family. Our collaborative approach values communication between the members of your team to provide you with seamless care from a group of experts.”
— Shannon M. Colohan, MD, reconstructive plastic surgeon

Reconstructive surgeons

Meet the caring, dedicated people from the UW Center for Reconstructive Surgery who treat SCCA patients. In addition to our medical providers, we also have a dedicated team of clinic and operating room nurses, medical assistants and schedulers who all specialize in reconstructive surgery.

Shannon M. Colohan, MD
Shannon M. Colohan, MD
Physician
Surgery
Sarah R. Goldsberry-Long, MD, MS
Sarah R. Goldsberry-Long, MD, MS
Physician
Surgery
Suzanne  Inchauste, MD
Suzanne Inchauste, MD
Physician
Surgery
Rachel  Lentz, MD
Rachel Lentz, MD
Physician
Surgery
Otway  Louie, MD
Otway Louie, MD
Physician
Surgery
Isaac C. Stein, MD
Isaac C. Stein, MD
Physician
Surgery
Duane  Wang, MD
Duane Wang, MD
Physician
Surgery

Advanced practice providers

All of our advanced practice providers specialize in reconstructive surgery. 

Anne Chapin, PA-C
Anne Chapin, PA-C
Maria Rahardja DNP, ARNP
Maria Rahardja DNP, ARNP
Shirley M. Taylor, MN, ARNP, ANP-BC, CWCN-AP
Shirley M. Taylor, MN, ARNP, ANP-BC, CWCN-AP

What each team member does

Advanced practice provider

Advanced practiced providers have training that is similar to physicians and can see you without your physician. At SCCA and UW, these health care professionals work closely with your physicians. There are two types: physician assistants (PAs) and advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs). They help provide and coordinate your treatment and also help manage the effects of your disease and treatment.

Nurse practitioner A registered nurse who has additional education and training in how to diagnose and treat disease. In cancer care, a nurse practitioner may manage the primary care of patients and their families. A registered nurse who has additional education and training in how to diagnose and treat disease. Nurse practitioners are licensed at the state level and certified by national nursing organizations. In cancer care, a nurse practitioner may manage the primary care of patients and their families, based on a practice agreement with a physician. Physician assistant A health professional who is licensed to do certain medical procedures under the guidance of a physician. A health professional who is licensed to do certain medical procedures under the guidance of a physician. A physician assistant may take medical histories, do physical exams, take blood and urine samples, care for wounds and give injections and immunizations.
Patient care coordinator

Your patient care coordinator (PCC) works closely with you and your physicians. They will be your surgery scheduler. Each surgeon usually has their own PCC. If you will have two or more surgeons, their PCCs work together to schedule your surgery.

Reconstructive plastic surgeon

This physician does surgery to improve your function, appearance or both after cancer treatment, if you want or need it. Based on your exact needs, they may work closely with your cancer surgeon to operate on the same day your cancer is removed, or they may do your reconstruction later in a separate procedure.

Your reconstructive surgeon:

  • Sees you if your evaluation shows that reconstruction is possible and needed and if you are interested. They meet with you to talk about options.
  • Recommends surgery to match your specific case, based on your health needs and your wishes.
  • Talks with you about the benefits and risks.
  • Answers your questions about reconstruction, like what to expect.
  • Does your surgery, along with a team that includes an anesthesiologist and nurses. 
  • Sees you after surgery to check your healing.
  • Offers you ways to prevent, relieve and cope with side effects of surgery.

Coordinates with the rest of your care team if you need other types of treatment.

Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.
Supportive care team

Many types of supportive care team members are here to help you and your family. They include dietitians, physical therapists, pain medicine specialists, psychologists, social workers, spiritual health staff, genetic counselors, palliative care specialists, naturopaths and acupuncturists.

Supportive Care Services