Seattle Cancer Care Alliance is an Authorized Treatment Center for Ide-cel CAR T-Cell Therapy

Cancer center among the first in the nation to offer the first approved CAR T-cell therapy for adults with multiple myeloma.

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. T cells are taken from a patient’s blood. Then, in the laboratory, the gene for a special receptor that binds to a certain protein on the patient’s cancer cells is added to the T cells. This special receptor is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Large numbers of the CAR T cells are grown in the laboratory and given to the patient by infusion. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy is used to treat certain blood cancers, and it is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. Also called CAR T-cell therapy.

SEATTLE – (May 13, 2021) - Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA), the only National Comprehensive Cancer Network designated cancer center in Washington State, today announced that it is an authorized treatment center for the new B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, idecabtagene vicleucel, also known as ide-cel.  

Ide-cel was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on March 26, 2021, and is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma after four or more prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor, an immunomodulatory therapy and an anti-CD38 antibody. It is the first cell-based gene therapy approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma and is being marketed under the brand name Abecma.®

“We are pleased to offer this new advanced therapy to patients who are suffering from relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma,” said Nancy Davidson, MD, president and executive director of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. “We are committed to delivering personalized care to our patients and improving patient outcomes and excited to be among the first cancer centers in the nation to offer this treatment to adult patients with multiple myeloma.”

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells in which abnormal plasma cells build up in bone marrow and limit the body’s ability to make enough healthy blood cells, thus resulting in low blood counts. Multiple myeloma is also associated with bone and kidney damage as well as a weakened immune system. There are over 140,000 people in the United States living with this cancer and according the American Cancer Society approximately 34,920 new cases will be diagnosed in 2021, and 12,410 deaths among those with multiple myeloma will occur.  

Ide-cel is a one-time therapy that is created from a patient’s own white blood cells, which have been modified to recognize and attack myeloma cells. As an anti-BCMA CAR T-cell therapy, ide-cel recognizes and binds to BCMA, a protein that is nearly universally expressed on cancer cells in multiple myeloma, leading to the death of BCMA-expressing cells.

In the clinical study that supported its approval, ide-cel was shown to be safe and effective. Approximately 72% of patients partially or completely responded to the treatment with 28% of patients showing complete response. An estimated 65% of this group remained in complete response to ide-cel for at least 12 months.

“The FDA approval of this novel therapy is a significant milestone in the advancement of new, innovative therapies for multiple myeloma,” said David Maloney, MD, PhD, medical director for cellular immunotherapy at the Bezos Family Immunotherapy Clinic at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. “We are excited about the continued expansion of CAR T-cell treatment options available to our patients, and the potential ide-cel offers to extend the lives of those who have multiple myeloma.” 

“Our clinical trials at the SCCA have provided us with extensive experience using BCMA CAR T-cells for multiple myeloma. The new FDA approval allows our to leverage this knowledge and safely bring a promising therapy to a wider population of adult patients with multiple myeloma,” said Damian Green, MD, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and Associate Professor, and who leads translational myeloma research programs at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

SCCA is home to several of the world’s leading immunotherapy experts whose research has contributed to the foundation of many immunotherapies currently used to treat cancer. SCCA’s Bezos Family Immunotherapy Clinic, which opened in 2016, is a state-of-the-art center dedicated to offering the newest cellular immunotherapy clinical trials and FDA approved treatments.

 

About Seattle Cancer Care Alliance 

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance brings together the leading research teams and cancer specialists from Fred Hutch, Seattle Children’s and UW Medicine — one extraordinary group whose sole purpose is the pursuit of better, longer, richer lives for our patients. Based in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance has nine clinical care sites in the region, including a medical oncology clinic at EvergreenHealth in Kirkland; hematology/medical oncology and infusion services at Overlake Medical Center in Bellevue, medical and radiation oncology clinics at UW Medical Center - Northwest Seattle and medical oncology services at SCCA Issaquah, as well as Network affiliations with hospitals in five states. For more information about SCCA, visit seattlecca.org.

Contacts:

Karina San Juan, ksanjuangu@seattlecca.org or (206) 606-1926

Heather Platisha, hplatisha@seattlecca.org or (206) 606-7239
 

Antibody A protein made by immune system cells and released into the blood. Antibodies defend the body against foreign substances, such as bacteria. Antigen A foreign substance, such as bacteria, that causes the body’s immune system to respond by making antibodies. Antibodies defend the body against antigens. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. T cells are taken from a patient’s blood. Then, in the laboratory, the gene for a special receptor that binds to a certain protein on the patient’s cancer cells is added to the T cells. This special receptor is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Large numbers of the CAR T cells are grown in the laboratory and given to the patient by infusion. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy is used to treat certain blood cancers, and it is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. Also called CAR T-cell therapy. Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Gene The functional and physical unit of heredity passed from parent to offspring. Genes are pieces of DNA, and most genes contain the information for making a specific protein. Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Infusion An injection of medications or fluids into a vein over a period of time. Refractory In medicine, refractory disease is a disease or condition that does not respond to treatment. Relapse The recurrence (return) of disease after an apparent recovery.