Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Clinicians Present New Research at 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology

Key research spans CAR T-cell therapies and treatments for myeloma, leukemia and more.

Seattle, Wash. (December 9, 2021) Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA), the only National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)-designated cancer center in Washington state, today announced that more than 20 of the organization’s clinicians will showcase new research at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), taking place December 11-14, 2021, in Atlanta.

SCCA clinicians and researchers will unveil findings on areas of investigation into treatments for patients with various hematological malignancies, including lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma. Clinicians will discuss findings on CAR-T therapies targeting CD20 cells, multiple myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Key research also includes findings on hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) and outcomes and utilization for a range of treatments.

“Our team at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance is committed to understanding, developing and advancing cutting-edge cancer treatments,” said Nancy Davidson, MD, president and executive director of SCCA. “Our researchers and clinicians are known leaders in the hematological clinical research space; we are proud of their work and continued contributions to this space. We look forward to energized discussion on the implications of the research presented and the role the research plays in contributing to expanded treatment options for patients.”

For more information about SCCA physician-researchers presenting their pioneering research at the 63rd ASH annual meeting, visit https://www.seattlecca.org/conference/ash-2021.

 Below is a list of SCCA’s lead abstracts and presentations:

CAR-T Therapies:

Abstract: 3872 - Safety and Efficacy of Third Generation CD20 Targeted CAR-T (MB-106) for Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory B-NHL and CLL

 

Abstract: 2815 - Pharmacodynamic Analysis of CAR-T Cell Persistence in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Treated with NKTR-255, an IL-15 Receptor Agonist That Enhances CD8+ T-Cells: Preliminary Results from a Phase 1 Study

 

Abstract: 1749 - Long-Term Follow-up and Single-Cell Multiomics Characteristics of Infusion Products in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treated with CD19 CAR-T Cells

 

Abstract: 551 - Safety and Efficacy of Fully Human BCMA CAR T Cells in Combination with a Gamma Secretase Inhibitor to Increase BCMA Surface Expression in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

 

Abstract: 905 - Clinical Translation of SC-DARIC33: A Pharmacologically Controlled CD33-Targeted Anti-AML CAR T Cell Product Regulated By Low Nanomolar Concentrations of Rapamycin

 

Abstract: 470 - SCRI-CAR19x22v2 T Cell Product Demonstrates Bispecific Activity in B-ALL

 

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HCT):

Abstract: 645 - Donor Bone Marrow Derived Macrophage Engraftment into the Central Nervous System of Allogeneic Transplant Patients

 

Abstract: 646 - Non-Genetic Determinants of Clonotypic T Cell Expansion Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

 

Abstract: 2868 - COVID-19 in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: A CIBMTR Study

 

Abstract: 648 - Early Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation Is Associated with the Loss of Recipient-Derived Humoral Immunity and Is Reduced By IL-6 Inhibition

  • SCCA Author: Ping Zhang, MD

 

Treatments of Hematological Malignancies:

Abstract: 1208 - The Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Interim Results of a Phase 4 Study

 

Abstract: 34 -  A Phase 1/2 Trial of Cladribine, High-Dose Cytarabine, G-CSF, and Dose-Escalated Mitoxantrone (CLAG-M) Plus Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Adults with Newly-Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or Other High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasm

 

Abstract: 813 -  Efficacy and Safety of Parsaclisib in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma: Primary Analysis from a Phase 2 Study (CITADEL-203)

 

Abstract: 233 - Concurrent Pembrolizumab with AVD for Untreated Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

 

Abstract: 1410 - Phase 2 Study of Zanubrutinib in BTK Inhibitor-Intolerant Patients (Pts) with Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Malignancies

 

Abstract: 1363 - Oral Ixazomib in Untreated Follicular Lymphoma Permits COVID-19 Vaccine Response and Its Efficacy Is Associated with Clinical Factors and Gene Expression Signatures

 

Abstract: 799 - Global Proteomic Profiling Identifies Novel Prognostic Factors in Undifferentiated Leukemia Blasts from Patients with NPM1 Mutations: A Previously Unreported Approach to Biomarker Discovery from the Fred Hutch and SWOG

 

Abstract: 403 - CD22 CAR Optimization for Improved in-Human Activity Following Inadequate CD22 CAR Activity in Phase 1 Clinical Trial PLAT-04

 

Abstract: 2339 - Infectious Complications after Intensive Chemotherapy with CLAG-M or ‘7+3’ for Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

 

Abstract: 3341 - Development of Astatine-211 (211At)-Based Anti-CD123 Radioimmunotherapy for Acute Leukemias and Other CD123+ Hematologic Malignancies

 

Abstract: 2745 - TIG-007: Study of EOS884448/GSK4428859A Alone, and in Combination with Iberdomide with or without Dexamethasone, in Participants with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

 

Abstract: 3909 - Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) Among Patients with Steroid-Refractory or -Dependent Chronic Graft-vs-Host Disease (cGVHD) Randomized to Ruxolitinib (RUX) vs Best Available Therapy (BAT)

 

Abstract: 2094 - Absence of Hyperactivation of Fibrinolysis Explains the Lack of Hemostatic Efficacy of Prophylactic Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in Hypoproliferative Thrombocytopenia

 

Abstract: 1609 - The IL-2/IL-15 Mimetic NL-201 Prevents Myeloma Relapse after ASCT By Expanding Highly Cytolytic T Cells in the Bone Marrow That Are Resistant to Exhaustion

  • SCCA Author: Simone A. Minnie, PhD

 

Abstract: 328 - The Combination of Anti-Tigit and Lenalidomide Promotes Synergistic Myeloma-Specific Immunity after ASCT

  • SCCA Author: Simone A. Minnie, PhD

 

About Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance brings together the leading research teams and cancer specialists from Fred Hutch, Seattle Children’s and UW Medicine — one extraordinary group whose sole purpose is the pursuit of better, longer, richer lives for our patients. Based in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance has ten clinical care sites in the region, including Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Proton Therapy Center, a medical oncology clinic at EvergreenHealth in Kirkland; hematology/medical oncology and infusion services at Overlake Medical Center in Bellevue, medical and radiation oncology clinics at UW Medical Center - Northwest Seattle and medical oncology services at SCCA Issaquah, as well as Network affiliations with hospitals in five states. For more information about SCCA, visit seattlecca.org.

Contacts

Karina San Juan, ksanjuangu@seattlecca.org or (206) 606-1926 

Heather Platisha, hplatisha@seattlecca.org or (206) 606-7239

Allogeneic stem cell transplant Uses bone marrow or stem cells from a related or unrelated donor whose tissue type closely matches the patient’s. Replaces blood-forming cells that have been destroyed by disease or cancer treatment. Uses bone marrow or stem cells from a donor whose tissue type closely matches the patient’s to replace blood-forming cells that have been destroyed by disease or cancer treatment. This can be from a related or unrelated donor. Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. Chemotherapy Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It may be given alone or with other treatments. Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemotherapy may be given by mouth, injection, infusion or on the skin, depending on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. It may be given alone or with other treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy or biologic therapy. Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Follicular lymphoma A type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (cancer of the immune system) that is usually indolent (slow-growing). The tumor cells grow as groups to form nodules. A type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (cancer of the immune system) that is usually indolent (slow-growing). The tumor cells grow as groups to form nodules. There are several subtypes of follicular lymphoma. Gene The functional and physical unit of heredity passed from parent to offspring. Genes are pieces of DNA, and most genes contain the information for making a specific protein. Hematopoietic stem cell An immature cell that can develop into all types of blood cells, including white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Hematopoietic stem cells are found in the blood and the bone marrow. An immature cell that can develop into all types of blood cells, including white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Hematopoietic stem cells are found in the blood and the bone marrow. Also called blood stem cell. Infusion An injection of medications or fluids into a vein over a period of time. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer. Mutation Any change in the DNA sequence of a cell. Mutations may be caused by mistakes during cell division, or they may be caused by exposure to DNA-damaging agents in the environment. Any change in the DNA sequence of a cell. Mutations may be caused by mistakes during cell division, or they may be caused by exposure to DNA-damaging agents in the environment. Mutations can be harmful, beneficial or have no effect. If they occur in cells that make eggs or sperm, they can be inherited; mutations that occur in other types of cells are not inherited. Certain mutations may lead to cancer or other diseases. A mutation is sometimes called a variant. Refractory In medicine, refractory disease is a disease or condition that does not respond to treatment. Relapse The recurrence (return) of disease after an apparent recovery. Relapse The recurrence (return) of disease after an apparent recovery. Stem cell A cell from which other types of cells develop. For example, blood cells develop from blood-forming stem cells. Steroid A type of drug used to relieve swelling and inflammation. Some steroid drugs may also have antitumor effects. T cell A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T lymphocyte and thymocyte. T cell A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T lymphocyte and thymocyte.