Courtney Bush, PT, DPT

To schedule a physical therapy appointment, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) patients need to be referred by an SCCA physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner. Patients who have secondary lymphedema can be seen at the SCCA clinic by one of our physical therapists specializing in oncology.

Courtney Bush, PT, DPT
Courtney Bush, PT, DPT

As a yoga instructor since 2011, Courtney found her passion in teaching, personal connection and physical movement as a vital component of health and wellbeing. A desire to be able to do more for her clients lead her to return to school to pursue a career in physical therapy. 

Courtney is continuously awestruck and inspired by the resiliency and motivation of patients undergoing cancer treatment. She has seen first-hand the benefits of movement, exercise and physical therapy intervention to improve quality of life, independence and mobility through all phases of cancer treatment and feels lucky to play a small role in supporting individuals navigate this journey. 
 

Patient care philosophy

Courtney believes physical therapy requires teamwork to bring together her expertise in functional mobility and exercise with her patients. Listening to understand her patient’s experience in their own words and cultivate goals together helps Courtney bring her skills to meet the patient where they are to help maximize their mobility, independence and quality of life through cancer treatment.

Clinical expertise

Courtney comes to SCCA from the University of Washington Medical Center at Montlake where she completed a year-long clinical residency from 2019-2020, following which she worked as part of the Acute Care Oncology PT team. She has worked primarily with patients undergoing stem cell transplant in both inpatient and outpatient settings. She also routinely treats patients with bone metastases and diagnoses of multiple myeloma and sarcoma to help them understand safe movement patterns and maximize functional mobility. 

Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. Stem cell A cell from which other types of cells develop. For example, blood cells develop from blood-forming stem cells.
Education and training
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy from Regis University in Denver
  • Clinical Residency in Acute Care Physical Therapy at University of Washington Medical Center
  • APTA, Academy of Oncology member
  • Certified Clinical Instructor