Top Doctor Top Doctor
The Top Doctor award is a peer-nominated award for providers who give exceptional care.

Lynne P. Taylor, MD, FAAN, FANA

Physician
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Clinical Professor, Department of Neurology; Department of Neurological Surgery; Division of Medical Oncology
University of Washington School of Medicine
Co-director, Alvord Brain Tumor Center at UW Medical Center
UW Medicine
Alexander M. Spence Endowed Chair in Neuro-oncology
UW Medicine
Specialty:
Medical Oncology
“Diseases that impact the brain strike at the heart of who a person is as an individual. I focus on demystifying the brain and giving you and your loved ones the tools that you need to cope with your illness.”
— Dr. Taylor
Why do you practice neuro-oncology?

During my residency training, I had a mentor, Dr. Jerome Posner, who initially inspired my interest in neuro-oncology. Considered to be the father of this field, he saw a need for a specialty that combined the skills of a neurologist and an oncologist. It’s still a relatively small area of medicine, with only about 250 board-certified neuro-oncologists in the U.S. While my mentor’s dynamic personality and curiosity drew me to this specialty, it’s the patients and families that have kept me intrigued all these years. Diseases that impact the brain strike at the heart of who a person is as an individual. I focus on demystifying the brain and giving you and your loved ones the tools that you need to cope with your illness.

Neuro-oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating brain tumors and other tumors of the nervous system. Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation.
Taylor-secondary.jpg
How do you like to collaborate with patients?

I bring a holistic perspective to care, taking into account who you are as a person as well as your relationships to your family and community. One of the most important things I can do is help you clarify your personal goals, because whatever treatments we pursue should be in service of those goals. I like to have in-depth discussions about what matters to you, both in the short and long term: for example, is it spending time with family at home during the holidays, getting to see a child graduate from high school or taking a planned trip abroad? I also spend a lot of time on education, showing you how to read a brain MRI scan and interpret a neurologic exam. Sharing this knowledge puts you in a better position to understand your symptoms and develop workarounds to improve your quality of life. 

Magnetic resonance imaging A procedure in which radio waves and a powerful magnet linked to a computer are used to create detailed pictures of areas inside the body. A procedure in which radio waves and a powerful magnet linked to a computer are used to create detailed pictures of areas inside the body. These pictures can show the difference between normal and diseased tissue. MRI makes better images of organs and soft tissue than other scanning techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) or X-ray. MRI is especially useful for imaging the brain, the spine, the soft tissue of joints and the inside of bones. Symptom A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. Some examples of symptoms are headache, fatigue, nausea and pain.

Provider background

Specialty: Medical Oncology

Brain and spinal cord cancers, neurologic complications of cancer, palliative care

Providing expert, compassionate neuro-oncology care has been the focus of my career for more than 30 years. I specialize in treating patients with primary brain tumors as well as cancers that have spread to the brain and spinal cord from other parts of the body. Triple-board certified in neurology, neuro-oncology and palliative care, I serve as the co-director of UW Medical Center’s Alvord Brain Tumor Center. SCCA and the Alvord Brain Tumor Center frequently collaborate on care, particularly for patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and those with cancers that have spread to the brain or spinal fluid. 

In addition to working with patients, I am also an active researcher. My interests include clinical trials for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (a type of brain cancer), recurrent glioblastoma and primary (CNS) lymphoma. 

Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.

Diseases treated

Education, experience and certifications
Medical Degree
Washington University School of Medicine
Residency
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Neurology
Fellowship
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Neurology
Board Certification
Neurology, 1987; Hospice and Palliative Care, 2010, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; Neuro-Oncology, 2011, United Council for Neurologic Subspecialities
Other
Internship, Barnes-Jewish Hospital
Languages
English
Awards
Seattle magazine's 2021 Top Doctors Award

Dr. Taylor received this peer-nominated award multiple years in a row in recognition of delivering exceptional care.

Testimonials

“Dr. Taylor is a model of compassion and expertise. The way she has dedicated herself to caring for patients and increasing the knowledge of the field of neuro-oncology is inspiring. ”
— Tresa McGranahan, MD, PhD

Research

Clinical trials

We make promising new treatments available to you through studies called clinical trials led by SCCA doctors. Many of these trials at SCCA have led to FDA-approved treatments and have improved standards of care globally. Together, you and your doctor can decide if a study is right for you.

Study ID:
NCT02831959
Effect of TTFields (150 kHz) in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients With 1-10 Brain Metastases Following Radiosurgery (METIS)
Complete title
METIS: Pivotal, open-label, randomized study of radiosurgery with or without Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) for 1-10 brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Study ID:
NCT02684838
Complete title
Vigilant Observation of Gliadel Wafer Implant (VIGILANT) Registry: A Multicenter, Observational Registry to Collect Information on the Safety and Effectiveness of Gliadel Wafer (Carmustine Implant) Used in Usual Medical Practice
Study ID:
NCT02831959
Effect of TTFields (150 kHz) in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients With 1-10 Brain Metastases Following Radiosurgery (METIS)
Complete title
METIS: Pivotal, open-label, randomized study of radiosurgery with or without Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) for 1-10 brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Your care team

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes doctors, a team coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.
Registered nurse (RN)
Registered nurse (RN)
Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician and assists with care procedures and treatments.
Patient care coordinator
Patient care coordinator
Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician and serves as your scheduler.

Insurance

SCCA accepts most national private health insurance plans as well as Medicare. We also accept Medicaid for people from Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We are working to ensure that everyone, no matter what their financial situation, has access to the care they need.

For providers