Jordan Gauthier, MD, MSc

Physician
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Assistant Professor, Division of Medical Oncology
University of Washington School of Medicine
Physician
UW Medicine
Assistant Professor, Clinical Research Division
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Specialty:
Medical Oncology
“I see every patient encounter as a precious opportunity to help, engage and learn.”
— Dr. Gauthier
Why do you practice hematology-oncology?

The meaningful connections I make with patients are part of what I enjoy about this specialty. One of my favorite memories is bonding with a patient who was undergoing a bone marrow transplant. He was a talented engineer and would show me pictures of all the amazing objects he built. He also taught me all about Japanese dog breeds and, I hope, I was able to teach him about the workings of the immune system. Not only did we develop an easy rapport, but we learned from each other, and I was grateful I could accompany him on his journey.

Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets.
Gauthier-secondary.jpg
What’s it like to work with you?

I strive to be mindful of your life story beyond your disease, learning about your goals for care, your support system and what activities bring you joy. Depending on your interest and level of comfort, I like to share with you what’s going on beneath the surface of a symptom or disease process, discussing the biology of what’s happening so you know why you aren’t feeling well — or why you’re feeling better. As much as possible, I try to prepare you for what to expect during the treatment process so that you aren’t caught off guard by symptoms or side effects.

Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Symptom A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. Some examples of symptoms are headache, fatigue, nausea and pain. Symptom A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. A physical or mental problem that a person experiences that may indicate a disease or condition. Symptoms cannot be seen and do not show up on medical tests. Some examples of symptoms are headache, fatigue, nausea and pain.

Provider background

Specialty: Medical Oncology

Area of clinical practice

Adult Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Cellular Immunotherapy

Blood cancers

I am a hematologist-oncologist who specializes in treating blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. My expertise includes caring for patients receiving blood and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) as well as immunotherapies.

Much of my research so far has been focused on improving outcomes for patients treated with BMT or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. This cellular immunotherapy engineers T cells (a type of immune cell) to attack tumors. Through my work, I have identified factors that can help predict the success of CAR T-cell therapy for patients who have leukemia and lymphoma. My background also includes international research collaborations through the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Antigen A foreign substance, such as bacteria, that causes the body’s immune system to respond by making antibodies. Antibodies defend the body against antigens. Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. T cells are taken from a patient’s blood. Then, in the laboratory, the gene for a special receptor that binds to a certain protein on the patient’s cancer cells is added to the T cells. This special receptor is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Large numbers of the CAR T cells are grown in the laboratory and given to the patient by infusion. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy is used to treat certain blood cancers, and it is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. Also called CAR T-cell therapy. Hematologist A physician who specializes in diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues. Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer. T cell A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T lymphocyte and thymocyte.

Diseases treated

Education, experience and certifications
Undergraduate Degree
University of Rennes, France
Medical Degree
University of Rennes, France
Residency
Henri Warembourg Faculty of Medicine, Lille, France
Fellowship
Immunotherapy Integrated Research Center
Other
MSc, University of Lille, France
Languages
English
French
Awards
European Bone Marrow Transplantation Young Ambassador, 2017

This award recognizes talented scientists, physicians and nurses who are rising stars in the field of bone marrow transplantation.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center IIRC Fellowship Award

Dr. Gauthier was the first immunotherapy clinical fellow to serve in a joint Immunotherapy Integrated Research Center (IIRC) program in clinical and laboratory research.

Research

Clinical trials

We make promising new treatments available to you through studies called clinical trials led by SCCA doctors. Many of these trials at SCCA have led to FDA-approved treatments and have improved standards of care globally. Together, you and your doctor can decide if a study is right for you.

Study ID:
NCT04359784
Anakinra for the Prevention of Cytokine Release Syndrome and Neurotoxicity in Patients With B-Cell Lymphoma Receiving CD19-Targeted CAR-T Cell Therapy
Complete title
Phase 2 Pilot Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Anakinra to Prevent CD19-targeted CAR-T Cell-Related Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS) and Neurotoxicity in Patients with B Cell Lymphoma

Publications

Many of our SCCA physicians conduct ongoing research to improve standards of patient care. Their work is evaluated by other physicians and selected for publication to the United States National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world. See scientific papers this SCCA provider has written.

Press

SCCA providers are often asked to give their medical expertise for press and news publications. Read articles by or about this SCCA provider.

Your care team

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes doctors, a team coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.
Registered nurse (RN)
Registered nurse (RN)
Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician and assists with care procedures and treatments.
Patient care coordinator
Patient care coordinator
Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician and serves as your scheduler.

Insurance

SCCA accepts most national private health insurance plans as well as Medicare. We also accept Medicaid for people from Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We are working to ensure that everyone, no matter what their financial situation, has access to the care they need.