Joshua Veatch, MD, PhD

Physician
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Acting instructor
University of Washington School of Medicine
Physician
UW Medicine
Research Associate
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Specialty:
Medical Oncology
“I believe in patient-centered care, and want to give patients a caring environment where they understand their treatment and have control over decisions. I also want to develop new therapies to help more patients.  ”
— Dr. Veatch
Why do you practice oncology?

Joshua Veatch, MD, PhD, has always been drawn to science. He ultimately decided to study medicine and make a career out of it because of the meaningful relationships physicians are able to have with their patients.  "I am both excited about the potential for developing new and better treatments for cancer, and am drawn to cancer care because of the depth of the relationships that can be formed with patients while they are going through something so hard and significant," he says.  For Dr. Veatch, not only does he see patients in clinic at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, but he is also involved in clinical research. He currently works with Dr. Stanley Riddell in the clinical research division at the Fred Hutch, working to develop new immune therapies to help patients with melanoma. In one project, they are developing a new type of cancer vaccine targeted at the mutations specific to a patient's cancer, in order to strengthen T-cell responses to fight the cancer. "We are also developing a new T-cell treatment for patients with the BRAF mutation," he says.  "I hope that combinations of different immune therapies enable more patients with cancer to have lasting remissions, and that is a goal I am working towards in the lab and in the clinic,” Dr. Veatch says.  Outside of work, Dr. Veatch enjoys rowing, hiking and cooking with his wife, son and daughter. 

Melanoma Cancer that begins in the melanocytes (cells that make the pigment melanin). It may begin in a mole (skin melanoma), but it can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as the eye or the intestines. Mutation Any change in the DNA sequence of a cell. Mutations may be caused by mistakes during cell division, or they may be caused by exposure to DNA-damaging agents in the environment. Any change in the DNA sequence of a cell. Mutations may be caused by mistakes during cell division, or they may be caused by exposure to DNA-damaging agents in the environment. Mutations can be harmful, beneficial or have no effect. If they occur in cells that make eggs or sperm, they can be inherited; mutations that occur in other types of cells are not inherited. Certain mutations may lead to cancer or other diseases. A mutation is sometimes called a variant. Remission A decrease in, or disappearance of, signs and symptoms of cancer. A decrease in, or disappearance of, signs and symptoms of cancer. In partial remission, some (but not all) signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared. In complete remission, all signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared, although cancer still may be in the body.

Provider background

Specialty: Medical Oncology

Diseases treated

Education, experience and certifications
Undergraduate Degree
Northwestern University
Medical Degree
University of Washington
Residency
University of Washington
Fellowship
University of Washington
Board Certification
Internal Medicine, 2013; Hematology, 2016; Medical Oncology 2016, American Board of Internal Medicine
Languages
English

Research

Clinical trials

We make promising new treatments available to you through studies called clinical trials led by SCCA doctors. Many of these trials at SCCA have led to FDA-approved treatments and have improved standards of care globally. Together, you and your doctor can decide if a study is right for you.

Study ID:
NCT03747484
Gene-Modified Immune Cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Merkel Cell Cancer
Complete title
ATTAC-MCC: Phase I/II study of Autologous CD8+ and CD4+ Transgenic T cells expressing high affinity MCPyV-specific TCRs combined with Avelumab and Class I MHC -upregulation in patients with metastatic MCC refractory to PD-1 axis blockade
Study ID:
NCT03747484
Gene-Modified Immune Cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Merkel Cell Cancer
Complete title
ATTAC-MCC: Phase I/II study of Autologous CD8+ and CD4+ Transgenic T cells expressing high affinity MCPyV-specific TCRs combined with Avelumab and Class I MHC -upregulation in patients with metastatic MCC refractory to PD-1 axis blockade
Study ID:
NCT03815058
A Study to Evaluate The Efficacy And Safety Of RO7198457 In Combination With Pembrolizumab Versus Pembrolizumab Alone In Participants With Previously Untreated Advanced Melanoma.
Complete title
Genentech GO40558 A Phase II, Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized Study Of The Efficacy And Safety Of RO7198457 In Combination With Pembrolizumab Versus Pembrolizumab In Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Melanoma

Your care team

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes doctors, a team coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.
Registered nurse (RN)
Registered nurse (RN)
Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician and assists with care procedures and treatments.
Patient care coordinator
Patient care coordinator
Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician and serves as your scheduler.

Insurance

SCCA accepts most national private health insurance plans as well as Medicare. We also accept Medicaid for people from Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We are working to ensure that everyone, no matter what their financial situation, has access to the care they need.

For providers