Corinne Summers, MD

Physician
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics
University of Washington School of Medicine
Assistant Professor, Clinical Research Division
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Physician
Seattle Children's
Specialty:
Medical Oncology
“I see myself as part of a team with you and your family. You know your child best; together, with our combined expertise, we choose the best path forward.”
— Dr. Summers
What do you enjoy about being a bone marrow transplant physician?

Transplant medicine is a very intellectually challenging specialty. Patients in need of a bone marrow transplant require complex care because so many different biological systems within the body are affected. I enjoy the level of nuance involved in working with these patients and the fact that there is always something new to learn about the immune system. Going through a transplant can feel like climbing a mountain. It’s incredibly rewarding to be there for children and their families as they make that ascent and afterwards, as they heal and work toward returning to their normal lives.

Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells.
Corinne Summers, MD
How do you approach care?

I see myself as part of a team with you and your family. You know your child best; together, with our combined expertise, we choose the best path forward. I put a lot of thought and care into my treatment recommendations, always sharing my rationale so that you feel well-informed and comfortable making decisions. A child who needs intense medical care can have a big impact on the entire family, from parents to siblings and other loved ones. I aim to support you through every step of this experience and help you access resources to sustain your family’s well-being.  

Provider background

Specialty: Medical Oncology

Area of clinical practice

Pediatric blood and marrow transplantation

Leukemia, other blood-related cancers

I specialize in pediatric bone marrow transplantation for children with hematologic malignancies (blood-related cancers), such as leukemia and lymphoma. I guide patients and families through the transplant process and provide long-term follow-up care through Seattle Children’s Bone Marrow Transplantation Transition Clinic. From a research perspective, I am developing cellular immunotherapy treatment options for patients pre- and post-transplant. These treatment options use a patient’s immune system cells to target and eliminate cancer. To further this goal, I lead studies at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research at Seattle Children’s.

Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.

Diseases treated

Education, experience and certifications
Undergraduate Degree
Florida State University
Medical Degree
Florida State University College of Medicine
Residency
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatrics
Fellowship
Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
Board Certification
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, 2017; Pediatrics, 2012, American Board of Pediatrics
Languages
English

Research

Clinical trials

We make promising new treatments available to you through studies called clinical trials led by SCCA doctors. Many of these trials at SCCA have led to FDA-approved treatments and have improved standards of care globally. Together, you and your doctor can decide if a study is right for you.

Study ID:
NCT03971799     Pediatric trial
Study of Anti-CD33 Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells (CD33CART) in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Complete title
Phase 1/2 Study of Anti-CD33 Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells (CD33CART) in Children and Young Adults with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Study ID:
NCT04571138     Pediatric trial
A Pediatric and Young Adult Trial of Genetically Modified T Cells Directed Against CD22 for Relapsed/Refractory Leukemia or Lymphoma
Complete title
Pediatric and Young Adult Leukemia Adoptive Therapy (PLAT)-07: A Phase 1/2 Study Of CD22-Specific CAR T Cells For CD22+ Leukemia or Lymphoma

Press

SCCA providers are often asked to give their medical expertise for press and news publications. Read articles by or about this SCCA provider.

Your care team

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes doctors, a team coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.
Registered nurse (RN)
Registered nurse (RN)
Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician and assists with care procedures and treatments.
Patient care coordinator
Patient care coordinator
Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician and serves as your scheduler.

Insurance

SCCA accepts most national private health insurance plans as well as Medicare. We also accept Medicaid for people from Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We are working to ensure that everyone, no matter what their financial situation, has access to the care they need.

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