Albert C. Yeh, MD

Physician
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Acting Instructor, Department of Medicine
University of Washington School of Medicine
Research Associate, Clinical Research Division
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Specialty:
Medical Oncology
“I believe in respecting every patient’s individual life circumstances, desires, goals and feelings about their illness so that we can personalize their treatment plan and help them achieve the best possible outcome.”
— Dr. Yeh
Why do you specialize in bone marrow transplantation?

My passion for working in the field of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) stems from a long-standing curiosity about how to better harness the immune system to treat cancer. Through BMT, we are able to treat a number of blood-related diseases that would otherwise be incurable. The opportunity to improve the efficacy and safety of BMT inspires me to specialize in this area of medicine. I’m always on the lookout for innovative therapeutic approaches that may benefit my patients.  

Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells.
Yeh
Tell us about an interaction with a patient that had a significant impact on you.

One of my fondest memories as a physician was when I had the privilege of working with an elderly woman who had traveled to the U.S. to seek treatment for lymphoma. She persevered through tough chemotherapy treatments and remained upbeat despite the obstacles she faced. Her positive attitude was inspiring. Our whole team was proud to have helped her through this rough time in her life, and ultimately we were able to get her back to her home country in remission. I believe in respecting every patient’s individual life circumstances, desires, goals and feelings about their illness so that we can personalize their treatment plan and help them achieve the best possible outcome.

Chemotherapy Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It may be given alone or with other treatments. Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemotherapy may be given by mouth, injection, infusion or on the skin, depending on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. It may be given alone or with other treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy or biologic therapy. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer. Remission A decrease in, or disappearance of, signs and symptoms of cancer. A decrease in, or disappearance of, signs and symptoms of cancer. In partial remission, some (but not all) signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared. In complete remission, all signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared, although cancer still may be in the body. Treatment plan A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A treatment plan may also include information about how much the treatment is likely to cost and about regular follow-up care after treatment ends.

Provider background

Specialty: Medical Oncology

Malignant and non-malignant blood disorders

I am a board-certified hematologist who specializes in caring for patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. As a physician-scientist, I spend part of my time in a laboratory setting studying the immune system. My research is focused on how T cells, which play a central role in the development of post-transplant conditions such as graft-versus-host disease, grow and expand after a transplant. Learning more about the role T cells play in the recovery of the immune system can help us improve treatment outcomes.

Benign Not cancer. Benign tumors may grow larger but do not spread to other parts of the body. Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Graft-versus-host disease A condition that occurs when donated stem cells or bone marrow (the graft) see the healthy tissues in the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack them. Hematologist A physician who specializes in diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues. T cell A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T lymphocyte and thymocyte. T lymphocyte A type of white blood cell. T lymphocytes are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T cells and thymocyte.

Diseases treated

Education, experience and certifications
Undergraduate Degree
Harvard University
Medical Degree
Harvard Medical School
Residency
Massachusetts General Hospital, Internal Medicine
Fellowship
University of Washington, Hematology-Oncology
Board Certification
Hematology, 2020, ; Internal Medicine, 2017, American Board of Internal Medicine
Languages
English
Chinese (Mandarin)
Awards
ASH Research Training Award for Fellows

Dr. Yeh received this award in 2020 from the American Society of Hematology. The award supports the work of junior researchers in hematology and hematology-related fields. 

Research

Clinical trials

We make promising new treatments available to you through studies called clinical trials led by SCCA doctors. Many of these trials at SCCA have led to FDA-approved treatments and have improved standards of care globally. Together, you and your doctor can decide if a study is right for you.

Publications

Many of our SCCA physicians conduct ongoing research to improve standards of patient care. Their work is evaluated by other physicians and selected for publication to the United States National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world. See scientific papers this SCCA provider has written.

Press

SCCA providers are often asked to give their medical expertise for press and news publications. Read articles by or about this SCCA provider.

Your care team

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes doctors, a team coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.
Marco  Mielcarek, MD, PhD
Marco Mielcarek, MD, PhD
Physician
Medical Oncology
Registered nurse (RN)
Registered nurse (RN)
Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician and assists with care procedures and treatments.
Patient care coordinator
Patient care coordinator
Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician and serves as your scheduler.

Insurance

SCCA accepts most national private health insurance plans as well as Medicare. We also accept Medicaid for people from Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We are working to ensure that everyone, no matter what their financial situation, has access to the care they need.

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