Healthcare professionals

Webinars for providers

The following webinars feature Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA), UW and Fred Hutch faculty discussing oncology trends and updates in the field. We invite you to watch these webinars and learn about the latest research happening at SCCA.

2021-2022

Immune-Related Adverse Events (irAEs)– A Series of Panels Exploring the Side Effects of Immunotherapy 

Provider-focused discussions on immunotherapy-related treatment, research updates and clinical challenges. The 90-minute sessions are approximately half didactic information presented by experts in the field and half panel case discussion and questions. Series co-chaired by Shailender Bhatia, MD and Petros Grivas, MD, PhD

Immunotherapy A type of therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. A therapy that uses substances to stimulate or suppress the immune system to help the body fight cancer, infection and other diseases. Some immunotherapies only target certain cells of the immune system. Others affect the immune system in a general way. Types of immunotherapy include cytokines, vaccines, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and some monoclonal antibodies. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.

Accreditation: 

The University of Washington School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 
 
The University of Washington School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. (Each session is 1.0 credit.)

Non-Monetary Compensation:

Free CME credit is offered with this live talk and if learners claim the free CME credit, the value is considered non-monetary compensation and tracked at $25 per learner, which meets Fair Market Value. Any learner can attend for free and choose not to claim free CME credit.

 

Previously recorded, on-demand videos

(Note that CME credit is not offered for the previously recorded talks in this irAE series)

Panel 3 Topic: Rheumatologic irAEs, recorded on October 9, 2021

Guest Speaker is Maria Suarez-Almazor, MD, PhD, Barnts Family Distinguished Professor at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Panel 2 Topic: “Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis”, recorded on June 26, 2021

Guest Speaker is Jarushka Naidoo, M.B.B.Ch, Assistant Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins.

Panel 1 Topic: “Immune-Related GI Toxicity: updates and clinical dilemmas”, recorded on April 24, 2021

Guest Speaker is Yinghong (Mimi) Wang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

2019-2020

Evolving Treatments for Hematologic Malignancies

The University of Washington School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.™ Valid for CME credit through October 31, 2021.

The purpose of this webinar is to provide hematologists, oncologists and advanced practice providers with a deeper understanding of indications and eligibility for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and CAR T-cell therapy in alignment with updated literature-based standard practice guidelines.

Speakers:

Andrew J. Cowan, MD
Marco Mielcarek, MD, PhD
Mary-Beth Percival, MD, MS
Sherilyn Tuazon, MD, MS

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. A type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. T cells are taken from a patient’s blood. Then, in the laboratory, the gene for a special receptor that binds to a certain protein on the patient’s cancer cells is added to the T cells. This special receptor is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Large numbers of the CAR T cells are grown in the laboratory and given to the patient by infusion. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy is used to treat certain blood cancers, and it is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. Also called CAR T-cell therapy. Hematologist A physician who specializes in diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues. Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation.

2017-2018

The following webinars are no longer available for CME credit.