Oral cancer treatment

Treatment

While many cancers of the head and neck are curable, treatment depends on where the cancer is, the severity of the disease, and the patient's age and overall health. The primary method of treatment is surgery (removing the cancer cells). Radiation (using high-dose X-rays to kill cancer cells) and chemotherapy (using high-dose anti-cancer medication) are also used.

Chemotherapy Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It may be given alone or with other treatments. Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemotherapy may be given by mouth, injection, infusion or on the skin, depending on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. It may be given alone or with other treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy or biologic therapy.

Treatment types

Treatment looks different for different people depending on your diagnosis. We tailor your treatment plan to you. Learn more about the treatment types offered at SCCA. 

Treatment plan A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A treatment plan may also include information about how much the treatment is likely to cost and about regular follow-up care after treatment ends.
Surgery

Great advances have been made in surgical procedures so that structures affected by cancer can either be spared from removal, or reconstructed well enough that the patient is not disfigured. The larynx, or voice box, can be saved in half the cases in which it would have been removed in the past. When part of the lower or upper jaw needs to be removed, doctors can now refashion a jawbone using bone from the patient's leg, hip, or shoulder blade. The tongue can even be reconstructed with appropriate soft tissue from various parts of the body.

For patients in whom a structure cannot be saved or restored, there are several new ways of helping to improve speech, swallowing, and other functions. Doctors can now restore a patient's vocal ability using a quick implant procedure. Other options for restoring a person's vocals include an electrolarnyx - a device placed against the neck to help form words and a tracheosophageal puncture - a surgical procedure that restores the patient's ability to deliver air into the throat and eventually allows speech.

Using a simultaneous, two-team approach during surgery, oncologic and reconstructive surgeons work alongside one another. Their team efforts, combined with the anesthesia and operating room nursing staff, has significantly shortened procedure times. After surgery, the team of nurses, speech pathologists, and social workers work with patients to help them recover and rehabilitate quickly.

Anesthesia Drugs or other substances that cause a loss of feeling or awareness. This keeps patients from feeling pain during surgery or other procedures. A loss of feeling or awareness caused by drugs or other substances. Anesthesia keeps patients from feeling pain during surgery or other procedures. Local anesthesia is a loss of feeling in one small area of the body, such as the mouth. Regional anesthesia is a loss of feeling in a part of the body, such as an arm or leg. General anesthesia is a loss of feeling and a complete loss of awareness that feels like a very deep sleep. Pathologist A physician who has special training in identifying diseases by studying cells and tissues under a microscope.
Surgery

Great advances have been made in surgical procedures so that structures affected by cancer can either be spared from removal, or reconstructed well enough that the patient is not disfigured. The larynx, or voice box, can be saved in half the cases in which it would have been removed in the past. When part of the lower or upper jaw needs to be removed, doctors can now refashion a jawbone using bone from the patient's leg, hip, or shoulder blade. The tongue can even be reconstructed with appropriate soft tissue from various parts of the body.

Radiation

Radiation typically involves external beam radiation. Another technique, known as intensity modulated radiation therapy, allows for very precise delivery of radiation therapy to tumors. Studies are showing that in some cases, radiation therapy alone, or sometimes combined with chemotherapy, is just as effective as surgery.

Chemotherapy Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It may be given alone or with other treatments. Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemotherapy may be given by mouth, injection, infusion or on the skin, depending on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. It may be given alone or with other treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy or biologic therapy. Radiation therapy The use of high-energy radiation from X-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. The use of high-energy radiation from x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external-beam radiation therapy), or it may come from radioactive material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy or brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance, such as a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, that travels in the blood to tissues throughout the body.
Radiation

Radiation typically involves external beam radiation.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is often used to enhance the response of cancer cells to radiation therapy and makes it possible to preserve organs, such as the larynx and tongue. Chemotherapy drugs include cisplatin, fluorouracil, methotrexate, carboplatin, and paclitaxel.

Chemotherapy Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It may be given alone or with other treatments. Treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemotherapy may be given by mouth, injection, infusion or on the skin, depending on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. It may be given alone or with other treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy or biologic therapy. Radiation therapy The use of high-energy radiation from X-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. The use of high-energy radiation from x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external-beam radiation therapy), or it may come from radioactive material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy or brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance, such as a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, that travels in the blood to tissues throughout the body.
Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is often used to enhance the response of cancer cells to radiation therapy and makes it possible to preserve organs, such as the larynx and tongue.

Targeted agents

Recently, the use of targeted therapy has shown progress and we have started using agents that specifically target growth receptors on tumor cells, such as cetuximab and erlotinib.

Targeted therapy A type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific types of cancer cells while causing less harm to normal cells. A type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific types of cancer cells while causing less harm to normal cells. Some targeted therapies block the action of certain enzymes, proteins or other molecules involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. Other types of targeted therapies help the immune system kill cancer cells, or they deliver toxic substances directly to cancer cells and kill them. Targeted therapy may have fewer side effects than other types of cancer treatment. Most targeted therapies are either small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies.
Targeted agents

Recently, the use of targeted therapy has shown progress and we have started using agents that specifically target growth receptors on tumor cells, such as cetuximab and erlotinib.