Hodgkin lymphoma

Care team

At Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA), we surround you with experts who focus completely on cancer, day in and day out.

A handful of people form the core of your care team. You have an oncologist who specializes in your disease, and a registered nurse. At some visits, you might see an advanced practice provider. A patient care coordinator schedules your visits. Others join your team based on your personal needs. We have specialists based at SCCA who know the issues that matter for people with cancer whether it’s helping control side effects to supportive care. They all work together – and with you – to provide support and treatment. 

Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.

What each team member does

Advanced practice provider (APP)

These health care professionals work closely with your hematologist-oncologist in the clinic. There are two types: physician assistants (PAs) and advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs). They help provide and coordinate your treatment and can see you independently from your physician. They also help manage the effects of your disease and treatment.

Hematologist A physician who specializes in diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues. Nurse practitioner A registered nurse who has additional education and training in how to diagnose and treat disease. In cancer care, a nurse practitioner may manage the primary care of patients and their families. A registered nurse who has additional education and training in how to diagnose and treat disease. Nurse practitioners are licensed at the state level and certified by national nursing organizations. In cancer care, a nurse practitioner may manage the primary care of patients and their families, based on a practice agreement with a physician. Physician assistant A health professional who is licensed to do certain medical procedures under the guidance of a physician. A health professional who is licensed to do certain medical procedures under the guidance of a physician. A physician assistant may take medical histories, do physical exams, take blood and urine samples, care for wounds and give injections and immunizations.
Hematologist-oncologist

This physician oversees your medicine-based treatments. 

Your hematologist-oncologist:

  • Sees you during your first visit. They evaluate you and order any tests you need to diagnose or stage your disease.
  • Explains what your diagnosis and stage mean, and answers your questions.
  • Recommends treatments to match your specific case. They select the medicines, doses, schedule and sequence. They also talk with you about the benefits and risks.
  • Sees you on a regular schedule to check how your cancer responds to treatment and how you are overall.
  • Offers you ways to prevent, relieve and cope with side effects of treatment — like medicine to help with nausea.
  • Coordinates with the rest of your care team if you need other types of treatment.
Hematologist A physician who specializes in diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Stage The extent of a cancer in the body. Staging is usually based on the size of the tumor, whether lymph nodes contain cancer and whether the cancer has spread from the original site to other parts of the body.
Infusion nurse

You receive any infusions in a dedicated area of the clinic. Cancer nurses who specialize in infusions give these treatments. They also check you during each infusion. They respond to any medical issues that come up and help keep you comfortable.

Infusion An injection of medications or fluids into a vein over a period of time. Infusion An injection of medications or fluids into a vein over a period of time.
Patient care coordinator

Your patient care coordinator works closely with you and your physician. They serve as your scheduler.

Radiation oncologist

This physician treats cancer with radiation. They prescribe and oversee this part of your care. Working with a radiation oncology team, they plan and deliver your treatments.

Your radiation oncologist:

  • Sees you if your evaluation shows that radiation therapy is likely to help. If you didn’t need radiation at the start of care but this changes, we arrange for you to see a radiation oncologist then.
  • Recommends radiation therapy to match your specific case. They decide the type, dose and schedule. They also talk with you about the benefits and risks.
  • Works behind the scenes with other radiation experts. These experts make sure you receive the right dose in the right places (dosimetrist). They also maintain the equipment used (medical physicist).
  • Answers your questions about radiation therapy, like why you need it and what to expect.
  • Sees you on a regular schedule during radiation therapy to check how your cancer responds and how you are doing overall.
  • Offers you ways to prevent, relieve and cope with side effects of treatment. 
  • Coordinates with the rest of your care team if you need other types of treatment.
Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation. Radiation oncologist A physician who has special training in using radiation to treat cancer. Radiation therapy The use of high-energy radiation from X-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. The use of high-energy radiation from x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external-beam radiation therapy), or it may come from radioactive material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy or brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance, such as a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, that travels in the blood to tissues throughout the body. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.
Radiation oncology nurse

This person sees you when you come in for radiation treatment. They explain your treatment, check your health, answer your questions and help you with side effects.

Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.
Radiation therapist

This person positions you each time you come in for radiation treatment. This ensures your treatment is precise. They also operate the machines that deliver the radiation. 

Registered nurse (RN)

Your nurse manages your care alongside your physician. They also assist with procedures and treatments. Nurses are resources for you and your caregiver. They answer questions and help with a wide range of topics, like how to cope with side effects or get other services you need at SCCA.

Caregiver A person who gives care to people who need help, such as children, older people or patients who have chronic illnesses or disabilities. A person who gives care to people who need help taking care of themselves, such as children, older people or patients who have chronic illnesses or disabilities. Caregivers may be health professionals, family members, friends, social workers or members of the clergy. They may give care at home, in a hospital or in another health care setting. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores. Side effects A problem that occurs when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Some side effects of cancer treatment are nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pain, decreased blood cell counts, hair loss and mouth sores.
Supportive care services

Many types of supportive care team members are here to help you and your family. They include dietitians, physical therapists, pain medicine specialists, psychologists, social workers, spiritual health staff, palliative care specialists, a naturopath and an acupuncturist.

Learn More About Our Supportive Care Services

Palliative care Care given to improve the quality of life of patients who have a serious or life-threatening disease. Care given to improve the quality of life of patients who have a serious or life-threatening disease. The goal of palliative care is to prevent or treat as early as possible the symptoms of a disease; any side effects caused by treatment of a disease; and psychological, social and spiritual problems related to a disease or its treatment. May also be called comfort care, supportive care or symptom management.
Transplant team

If you need a bone marrow transplant, you have a specialized team from the Fred Hutchinson Bone Marrow Transplant Program at SCCA. Your team includes a transplant oncologist, transplant nurse, pharmacist, dietitian, team coordinator and social worker. This team:

  • Evaluates you (and your donor, if you need one).
  • Selects a transplant approach to match your specific case. 
  • Prepares you and your caregiver.
  • Performs your transplant.
  • Provides care as you recover.
Bone marrow The soft, spongy material in the center of your bones that produces all your blood cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Bone marrow transplant The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. The process of treating disease with high doses of chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. Because this treatment destroys the bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells are given after treatment to help the body make more blood cells. Caregiver A person who gives care to people who need help, such as children, older people or patients who have chronic illnesses or disabilities. A person who gives care to people who need help taking care of themselves, such as children, older people or patients who have chronic illnesses or disabilities. Caregivers may be health professionals, family members, friends, social workers or members of the clergy. They may give care at home, in a hospital or in another health care setting. Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation.