Cutaneous Lymphoma

Cutaneous lymphoma overview

Cutaneous lymphomas, also known as lymphomas of the skin, are cancers of the lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) that are primarily in the skin, but may involve the lymph nodes, blood, and other organs. All cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL).

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is one of few centers in the United States that has experience treating cutaneous lymphoma and specializes in providing novel therapies and clinical studies for this rare disease. 

Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Lymphocyte A type of immune cell that is made in the bone marrow and is found in the blood and in lymph tissue. The two main types of lymphocytes are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. A type of immune cell that is made in the bone marrow and is found in the blood and in lymph tissue. The two main types of lymphocytes (white blood cells) are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. B lymphocytes make antibodies, and T lymphocytes help kill tumor cells and help control immune responses. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer. White blood cell A type of blood cell that is made in the bone marrow and found in the blood and lymph tissue. White blood cells are part of the body’s immune system and help the body fight infection and other diseases. A type of blood cell that is made in the bone marrow and found in the blood and lymph tissue. White blood cells are part of the body’s immune system. They help the body fight infection and other diseases. Types of white blood cells include granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils), monocytes and lymphocytes (T cells and B cells). Checking the number of white blood cells in the blood is usually part of a complete blood cell (CBC) test. It may be used to look for conditions such as infection, inflammation, allergies and leukemia. Also called leukocyte and WBC.

The T-Cell Lymphoma Program began in January 2009, and SCCA is an active member of the T-Cell Consortium—a small group of T cell lymphoma specialists from around the world who are working together toward a cure for this rare disease. SCCA's Cutaneous Lymphoma Specialty Clinic brings the activities of the T-Cell Lymphoma Program directly to patients. A team of specialists from dermatology, pathology, medical oncology, and radiation oncology provide a comprehensive approach to diagnose and treat patients with cutaneous lymphoma.

At SCCA, we view treatment as a collaborative effort. SCCA's Cutaneous Lymphoma Specialty Clinic brings together providers from many areas of cancer care: radiation oncology, medical oncologist, and dermatology, as well as pathology.  They coordinate to design a treatment plan tailored to you, and they involve other team members, such as a nutritionists, supportive care specialists, nurses, and social workers, depending on your needs.

Your doctors will discuss all of your options based on your diagnosis and how it has progressed. We’ll also consider your general health, lifestyle, and personal preferences. Together, your team will recommend a blend of treatments and a sequence in which to deliver your treatments to optimize your results.

Newly diagnosed

Studies have shown that the first treatment you receive for cancer is by far the most important. That’s why your first choice in a treatment center needs to be the right one.

  • Many patients who begin their treatment at SCCA have better outcomes than those who started treatment elsewhere.
  • The experts you need are right here: a world-class team of medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and pathologists.
  • As a member institution of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, SCCA is home to doctors who help define the guidelines for cancer care nationally.
  • Patients at SCCA have access to advanced therapies being explored in clinical studies conducted at SCCA and its founding organizations, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and UW Medicine.
  • You’ll also find the most advanced diagnostic, treatment, and recovery programs—as well as extensive support to help you cope with your cancer.
Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer. Oncologist A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment, such as treating cancer with radiation. A physician who has special training in diagnosing and treating cancer. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer treatment. For example, a radiation oncologist specializes in treating cancer with radiation. Pathologist A physician who has special training in identifying diseases by studying cells and tissues under a microscope. Radiation oncologist A physician who has special training in using radiation to treat cancer. T cell A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. A type of white blood cell. T cells are part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow. They help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. Also called T lymphocyte and thymocyte. Treatment plan A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A detailed plan with information about a patient’s disease, the goal of treatment, the treatment options for the disease and the possible side effects and expected length of treatment. A treatment plan may also include information about how much the treatment is likely to cost and about regular follow-up care after treatment ends.

Facts

Cutaneous lymphomas, also known as lymphomas of the skin, are cancers of the lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) that are primarily in the skin, but may involve the lymph nodes, blood, and other organs. All cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL).

Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.

Treatment

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is one of few centers in the United States that has experience treating cutaneous lymphoma and specializes in providing novel therapies and clinical studies for this rare disease. Patients are referred to SCCA for our collaborative efforts between research and clinical studies for peripheral (systemic) and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas in general, as well as specific subtypes, bringing focus to this challenging disease.

Clinical trial A type of research study that tests how well new medical approaches work in people. These studies test new methods of screening, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a disease. Lymphoma Cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.

Providers

At SCCA, you receive care from a team of providers with extensive experience in your disease. Your team includes physicians, a patient care coordinator, a registered nurse, an advanced practice provider and others, based on your needs. You also have access to experts like nutritionists, social workers, acupuncturists, psychiatrists and more who specialize in supporting people with cancer or blood disorders.