Text Size A A

E-Mail to a Friend






secret  Click to Play Audio


Clinical Studies for Breast Cancer

Clinical Studies for Breast Cancer

What is a clinical trial? Dr. VK Gadi addresses common misconceptions about clinical trials. He explains how cancer centers such as SCCA have access to not only phase III clinical trials, but phase I and phase II trials as well. Clinical trials provide access to novel drugs and treatments that are not commonly available. Dr. Gadi also explains how clinical trials are funded and how patients should not be worried about being stuck with the added burden of clinical trial expenses.

Related Videos

Clinical Trials for Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Heidi Gray discusses participation in clinical trials for ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer patients at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance are initially screened for eligibility to participate in a clinical trial. Trials range from Phase I trials that look at specific novel agents not available for use in oncology, to Phase III trials which are large national trials comparing a standard treatment to a treatment with additional therapy.    Patients are matched to trials that are the right fit for them. It is also important that they have a sense of being part of the greater good, as results are often not known for 3-5 years and participating in trials often involve more intense therapy, monitoring, and more frequent visits.

Clinical Studies for Breast Cancer

What is a clinical trial? Dr. VK Gadi addresses common misconceptions about clinical trials. He explains how cancer centers such as SCCA have access to not only phase III clinical trials, but phase I and phase II trials as well. Clinical trials provide access to novel drugs and treatments that are not commonly available. Dr. Gadi also explains how clinical trials are funded and how patients should not be worried about being stuck with the added burden of clinical trial expenses.

T-DM1 for Breast Cancer

Using T-DM1 for treating HER2-positive Breast Cancer Dr. Julie Gralow discusses newly approved drug T-DM1 and what this means for women living with HER2-positive breast cancer and other breast cancers. This exciting new category of breast cancer drug is an antibody that delivers chemo directly to the cancer cell, leaving the bulk of the body free of exposure to unnecessary chemotherapy. For the 20-25% of breast cancer patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and HER-2 express breast cancer this drug is significantly less toxic on the body. Side effects include a small chance of heart toxicity and a possible decrease in platelets. However, in general the side effects are markedly less than standard chemotherapy treatment with less reports of fatigue, no hair loss and no nausea and vomiting.

TIL Therapy for Advanced Melanoma

Dr. Sylvia Lee explains how tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy works to treat late-stage melanoma.