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Colon Cancer Doctor Videos

Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Dr. Alessandro Fichera is a nationally renowned, board certified colorectal surgeon specializing in minimally invasive and robotic surgery for gastrointestinal cancers. In this video, Dr. Fichera discusses developing specific treatments for specific patients. Treatment of colorectal cancer has become more and more individualized. At SCCA we are able to identify the specific treatment for the specific patient. We no longer just use an approach that is used for everybody. We are becoming more advanced, specialized and complex in the way we treat colorectal cancer. At SCCA, researchers and clinicians work together on the same cases making clinical research part of our treatment procedure.
Dr. Edward Lin

Dr. Edward Lin

Dr. Edward Lin is a medical oncologist who specializes in treating gastrointestinal cancers. In this video he describes how SCCA strives to better inform patients about their diagnosis and treatment plan, but more importantly, guide them on their treatment 1, 5, and even 10 years from now. This long-term relationship with patients shows just how successful SCCA is at treating cancer and our survival rate is of one of the best in the world. SCCA's physicians are heavily involved in the clinical trials and are constantly searching for new answers and new treatments for patients. Dr. Edward Lin also describes how SCCA is at the frontier of developing the next generation of gastrointestinal and cancer treatments.
Dr. Anthony Back

Dr. Anthony Back

Dr. Tony Back is a medical oncologist who treats patients with colorectal, esophageal, liver, pancreatic, and stomach cancer. In this video, Dr. Back discusses how doctor and patient communication is about creating a treatment alliance and creating a plan that both can move forward together on. When patients are involved with their care, they more closely follow the treatments and cope with them better because they know that they have a role in determining the care plan. Patients assume that when treating cancer they need to seek out the most technical and advanced resources possible. At Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, we strive to integrate advanced technical resources with the humanistic attributes of being a physician.
Dr. Andrew Coveler

Dr. Andrew Coveler

Dr. Andrew Coveler is a medical oncologist who treats cancers of the gastrointestinal system. In this video, Dr. Coveler discusses advances in gastrointestinal treatment at SCCA. ?Cancer treatments are good, but they?re not really good enough? says Dr. Coveler. This is what brought him to SCCA where he has become a gastrointestinal cancer specialist. That level of specialization made possible by SCCA can mean the difference between curable and not curable. We treat the some of the rarest forms of cancers from patients around the world. Over the last ten years, the introduction of new drugs like Herceptin, new surgical techniques and robotic surgery have dramatically improved gastrointestinal cancer survival rates. The team environment at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance brings all of the disciplines together to provide our patients with the best care in the world.

Colon Cancer Treatment Videos

Dr. Edward Lin at ASCO 2014

Dr. Edward Lin at ASCO 2014

Dr. Lin explains how the ADAPT trial may change the way we look at colorectal cancer treatment. 

Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. William Grady

Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. William Grady

Dr. William Grady discusses treatment for colon cancer. While many people want to ignore colon cancer, it is one of the most common cancer killers in the United States. Early stage cancers that haven?t spread outside the bowel can be treated by surgery alone, while more advanced metastatic cancers that have spread require surgery along with about six months of chemotherapy. The good news is that there are many more treatments available for colon cancer than even five years ago, and patients diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer are living two to three years instead of just a few months.
Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Dr. Alessandro Fichera gives an overview of colon cancer. The majority of colon cancer cases develop from small polyps that become larger and then cancerous. Other pathways are being identified stemming from flat lesions or associated with inflammatory bowel disease, which are more difficult to detect. Regular colonoscopies are vital for early detection, and should occur by age 50 in the general population, or age 40 or earlier by those with a family history or genetic predisposition. The latest advances in treatment for colon cancer include the ability to see better with endoscopy, more effective medical and radiation treatments, and minimally invasive surgery being as effective as open surgery. The five-year cure rate for stage I cancers are 90%, and stage III as high as 70-75%. The key to success is working with a multidisciplinary team and getting the best treatment the first time.
Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. David Byrd

Colon Cancer Treatment with Dr. David Byrd

Dr. David Byrd discusses treatment options for colon cancer. Most patients have surgery to remove their cancer, and chemotherapy to help prevent the cancer from coming back. Cancers that cannot be removed surgically can be controlled with chemotherapy. Biologic therapies are new medicines that attack cancer cells based on their biological features. These are sometimes called target therapies because they target cancer cells and spare normal cells, unlike most conventional chemotherapy. Survival reports from the National Cancer Data Base show that colon cancer patients who receive their first treatment at SCCA fare better compared to patients at other teaching or community hospitals.

Colon Cancer Screening Videos

Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. Alessandro Fichera

Dr. Alessandro Fichera talks about prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Dr. Fichera is a surgeon and Director of Colorectal Surgical Oncology at the University of Washington and SCCA. Dr. Fichera stresses that colon and rectal cancer can be detected early and even prevented through routine colonoscopies. Pre-malignant stage polyps can be found and removed. Current low fiber and high fat diets increase many problems, including promoting colorectal cancers. Everyone should have a colonoscopy by the age of 50. First degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer or polyps should have a colonoscopy by age 40. Earlier colonoscopies are recommended for individuals with a known mutation for familial polyposis, lynch syndrome, or other genetic predispositions.
Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. William Grady

Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. William Grady

Dr. William Grady discusses colon cancer screening recommendations. Colon cancer is the second most common cancer killer of men and women, yet is highly preventable through routine colonoscopies. Colon cancer is a disease of aging, so colonoscopies are recommended for individuals by the age of 50. Most colon cancers come from colon polyps, which can be found and removed during a colonoscopy, and almost prevent all colon cancers. Dr. Grady is happy to see individuals becoming more aware of and participating in screening with colonoscopies.
Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. Gabriela Chiorean

Colon Cancer Screening with Dr. Gabriela Chiorean

Dr. Gabriela Chiorean emphasizes the importance of routine screening for colon cancer, in this KOMO interview with Kent Phillips. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of death in the United States, but only about half of all people over the age of 50 undergo current recommended screenings. Colon cancer screening can save lives! If you are over 50 talk to your doctor about screening, and if you have a family history of colon cancer, start screening earlier and more frequently.

Colon Cancer Survivor Videos

Colon Cancer Survivor Mona Coyle

Colon Cancer Survivor Mona Coyle

Colon cancer Survivor Mona Coyle discusses being diagnosed with colon cancer in January 2006. After ignoring a decade of symptoms, Mona had her first colonoscopy and was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer, and had surgery to remove the tumor a week later. A year later her oncologist found a troubling spot on her lungs, and at this point she found the SCCA. Mona felt a positive difference at SCCA and their attitude that they were motivated to beat this, which made a world of difference to her. After two lung surgeries she has no evidence of disease, and is thinking more about life and not taking it for granted. Mona?s gut tells her that she is here today because she went to the SCCA.
Colon Cancer Survivor Gaetano Boriello

Colon Cancer Survivor Gaetano Boriello

Colon cancer survivor Gaetano Boriello discusses being diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer on August 18, 2008. Gaetano had been feeling lightheaded for a few months, and went in to see his doctor after almost fainting while on a business trip. He was found to be anemic and had a colonoscopy scheduled that afternoon, where they found a large tumor. It was later discovered that the tumor had spread outside his colon, and he also had tumors on his liver. Gaetano went to SCCA and the University of Washington where he opted for the more aggressive treatment of removing 1/3 of his colon, as well as liver surgery.
Colon Cancer Survivor Anita Mitchell

Colon Cancer Survivor Anita Mitchell

Colon cancer survivor Anita Mitchell discusses being diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer on February 3, 2005. Anita had been having symptoms and went in for a colonoscopy, where they discovered she had colon cancer and needed to make an appointment immediately and have surgery. Her dad had died of colon cancer, making it even more heartbreaking to tell her kids. Anita and her friends who are nurses researched surgeons to find the very best, and she ended up at SCCA where they discovered she had stage IV cancer with lesions on her liver. Although she was terrified that she would not come out of surgery, Anita read a book about hope that told her not to let anyone give her statistics, because they weren?t hers. She had the best oncologist who told her that he had a plan for her, and if that didn?t work he had another plan. His positive attitude gave her a glimmer of hope, which was all she needed.
Colon Cancer Survivor Barbara Crummins

Colon Cancer Survivor Barbara Crummins

Colon cancer Survivor Barbara Crummins discusses being diagnosed with colon cancer in January 2006, and her treatment at SCCA. Barbara was in her 40?s and had always been very health conscious. After eating a huge Mexican dinner one evening her stomach hurt and was swollen for four days before she went to see a GI doctor, who sent her to get an MRI. The surgeon who checked her scans told her he was going to stay late and operate because she probably wouldn?t live until tomorrow. Everything happened quickly and she didn?t quite know what was going on until the surgeon was in the next morning to explain that they removed a huge tumor in her colon, a chunk of her liver and 13 lymph nodes. She was given 3-6 months to live. Barbara switched and went to SCCA more treatment. Under the direction of Dr. Sam Whiting, she underwent a treatment plan that involved chemotherapy, along with some ideas she want to incorporate into her treatment plan including acupuncture. Barbara fought to beat her disease every day with a happy attitude, and consciously connected herself to joy.