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Patient Stories

A serious health condition may make you feel like you’re all alone. But you’re not. Over the years, many of our patients have shared their stories with us at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance so that we may share them with you.


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Breast Cancer Survivor

Breast Cancer Survivor

Diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in situ at age 29, Ashley Walker took an aggressive approach to treatment with a bilateral mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiation at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. 

Rectal Cancer Survivor

Rectal Cancer Survivor

Jeremy Lamb ignored symptoms for months until a colonoscopy revealed rectal cancer. Treated at SCCA on a clinical study of FOLFOX, surgery, and more FOLFOX, he is doing great.

Kidney Cancer Survivor

Kidney Cancer Survivor

Diagnosed with stage IV clear cell carcinoma in 2007, Richard Catlett is alive and well after a series of treatments, including a clinical study with nivolumab, an immunotherapy, at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Liver Cancer Survivor

Liver Cancer Survivor

After transfusions following a near-fatal car accident, Bill Zehner developed hepatitis C and then liver cancer. He received lifesaving treatment, including a liver transplant, at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and University of Washington Medical Center.

Myelodysplastic Syndrome Survivor

Myelodysplastic Syndrome Survivor

Diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome in 2004 at age 50, Thais Murdoch received standard treatment until 2014 when she had a bone marrow transplant at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance to halt her disease. 

Lung Cancer Survivor

Lung Cancer Survivor

Surprised to be alive after four years with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer, Wendy Polack, a nonsmoker, is grateful for the rare genetic mutation found in her cancer with UW-OncoPlex testing. It means she can take crizotinib (Xalkori), just two pills a day, with minimal side effects.

SCID Survivor

SCID Survivor

Rachel Dixon holds her son Ezra, who was born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). SCID affects about one in every 50,000 babies born in the U.S. After having a lifesaving bone marrow transplant from his brother Judah, Ezra is doing well.