Neuroblastoma

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Participate in a Study

Because cancer is rare in children, the medical community has cooperated for many years to investigate new treatments and treatment variations in an effort to identify the most effective and safest possible options. Clinical trials are an important part of this process.

In clinical trials, researchers prescribe promising treatment regimens. Then they monitor the patients’ responses carefully and compare this treatment to standard treatment. More than half of all children with cancer in the United States receive treatment through clinical trials.

Seattle Children’s, a Seattle Cancer Care Alliance parent organization, actively participates in childhood cancer research through its membership in the Children’s Oncology Group, (COG). COG brings together thousands of researchers from major universities and teaching hospitals throughout the United States and Canada, as well as other parts of the world, to cooperate on clinical trials designed to prevent and cure childhood cancers.

For an overview of what happens in clinical trials, read our Patient Guide to Clinical Trials, especially the section on Children & Clinical Trials.

To find clinical trials for which your child may be eligible, ask your child’s health-care team. You can also visit the listings of the Fred Hutchinson Consortium and the CureSearch web site, a combined effort of the National Childhood Cancer Foundation and the Children’s Oncology Group.

Read more about current clinical trials for Neuroblastoma.