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Bone Marrow Transplant

Bortezomib + Vorinostat Post Autologous SCT for Multiple Myeloma (FHCRC-2253)
Bortezomib and Vorinostat as Maintenance Therapy after Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Myeloma
Status Conditions Phase Study ID
Closed Multiple Myeloma (MM) Phase II FHCRC-2253
NCT00839956
Summary

RATIONALE: Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving bortezomib together with vorinostat after an autologous stem cell transplant may stop the growth of any cancer cells that remain after transplant.

PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying the side effects of giving bortezomib together with vorinostat and to see how well it works in treating patients with multiple myeloma who have undergone autologous stem cell transplant.


Investigator
Leona Holmberg, MD, PhD
Location    
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance 800-804-8824  
Eligibility Criteria (must meet the following to participate in this study)
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Diagnosis of multiple myeloma

    • Any disease stage allowed
  • Must have undergone autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation that included high-dose melphalan (≥ 140 mg/m²) within the past 30-120 days
  • No symptomatic ascites or pleural effusions
  • No history of CNS disease
Last Updated
July 25, 2012
See this trial at ClinicalTrials.gov
Access protocol and consent forms at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Disclaimer: We update this information regularly. However, what you read today may not be completely up to date.

Please remember:
  • Talk to your health care providers first before making decisions about your health care.
  • Whether you are eligible for a research study depends on many things. There are specific requirements to be in research studies. These requirements are different for each study.